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DISCUSSION ENG Young Adult Lit

12 Jul

DISCUSSION ENG Young Adult Lit 5-7 paragraphs answer 2 questions and elaborate on the topic of various formats of young adult literature.

We are discussing the variety of formats adolescent literature can take, especially in our digital age. After reading chapter 3 “New Technology, New Attitudes, and  New Literacies” (LITERATURE for Today’s Young Adults, Alleen Pace Nilsen, any edition) and experiencing some of the different formats and the variety of literacies involved in these formats, what do you see as the appeal or the drawbacks of these different ways of writing and reading adolescent literature? How is the experience of reading them different from the experience of reading traditional print texts?

Top of Form

Bottom of Form

The questions to consider include

  1. In addition to traditional prose, print text, what are the various forms adolescent literature can take, like Alice Fields virtual reality adventures (Perpetual Nomads) and the digital novel “Inanimate Alice: An Example of A Digital Novel”?
  2. How does the experience of reading adolescent literature in multimedia formats differ from the experience of reading it in traditional ways?
  3. View the video “New Literacies and New Forms.”

PART TWO

Summarize/Review Whale Talk by Chris Crutcher  in 5-7 paragraphs detail the book briefly with relevant content, professionally written. No revisions and no re-editing must be in final draft/drop mode?

 

 

 

t e c h n o l o g y   t o o l k i t

|  Making the Shift: YA Lit 2.0

page

50

Voices from the Middle

, Volume 17 Number 4, May 2010

Sandy Hayes, editor

t e c h n o l o g y   t o o l k i t

Making the Shift: YA Lit 2.0

 

/ 3

t e c h n o l o g y   t o o l k i t

|  Making the Shift: YA Lit 2.0

page

50

Voices from the Middle

, Volume 17 Number 4, May 2010

Sandy Hayes, editor

t e c h n o l o g y   t o o l k i t

Making the Shift: YA Lit 2.0

Web 1.0: Information

The  early  Internet  revolutionized  teachers’  ac-

cess  to  information  and  to  each  other.  In  1995,

Kathy  Schrock  began  her  Guide  for  Educators

website, an extensive hotlist of links to education

resources. In the same year, Bernie Dodge pub-

lished  his  WebQuest  website,  sending  students

out into the Internet on investigative missions.

YA Lit 1.0

Carol  Hurst’s  Children’s  Literature  Site,  which

made its debut in 1996, provided English teach-

ers primarily with lesson plans or extensive Cliff

Notes™-style information on authors and young

adult  literature  (for  example,  Cynthia  Kado-

hata,

Kira-Kira

,

http://www.carolhurst.com/titles/kira-

kira.html). Official author websites were primar-

ily  academic  and  impersonal  (see  Lois  Lowery,

http://tinyurl.com/llowry).  For  its  time,  Web-

Quests  were  inno-vative,  adding  opportunities

for collaboration while learning Web navigation

and website evaluation. But by today’s standards,

many of the early WebQuests were highly struc-

tured worksheet-like activities that concentrated

on knowledge-level thinking (refer to Characters

in

The  Sorcerer’s  Stone

http://tinyurl.com/hp2

webquest).

Web 1.5: Interaction

By 1999, blogs, a tool evolved from Web forums

and  bulletin  boards,  rapidly  became  popular.

Wikis followed soon after. These venues offered

more opportunity for authentic, collaborative in-

teractions.  Websites  began  to  contain  more  in-

teractivity  and  multimedia.  With  support  from

Verizon,   NCTE/IRA   began

ReadWriteThink.

org

,  publishing  classroom-tested,  peer-reviewed

lesson  plans.  Teachers  designed  literary  road

trips using Google maps. Lit trips for titles such

as

Walk Two Moons, Fever 1793, Hana’s Suitcase

,

and

Brothers in Hope: Lost Boys of Sudan

were pub-

lished at http://www.googlelittrips.org.

YA Lit 1.5

Author  websites  and  blogs  added  more  person-

alized  features  (photos,  fan  responses,  resources

for  teachers,  daily  life,  observations).  Some  ex-

amples:

Cynthia Kadohata,

Kira-Kira—

http://www.kira-

kira.us

The Sorcerer’s Stone—

http://www.scholastic.com/

harrypotter/books/stone

Lois Lowery— http://loislowry.typepad.

com

Blogs about young adult literature featuring book

reviews, interviews, author news:

http://www.kidlitosphere.org/bloggers

http://professornana.livejournal.com

Teacher blog example:

http://thereadingzone.wordpress.com/

2010/02

Web 2.0: Innovation

In 2004, the advent of social networking, podcast

and video-sharing sites, and the ease of mashups

enriched the multimedia content of the Web and

created a culture of freewheeling, innovative par-

ticipation. Many of these innovative sites offered

special  prices  and  privacy  features  directed  at

K–12 education. Websites increasingly provided

engaging  and  creative  content,  including  video,

games,  podcasts,  mashups,  and  content  created

by readers.

m50-52_May10_VM.indd   50

3/30/10   5:02 PM

page

51

Voices from the Middle

, Volume 17 Number 4, May 2010

t e c h n o l o g y   t o o l k i t

|  Making the Shift: YA Lit 2.0

YA Lit 2.0

Discussion about books

  • Online Book Club—Create with blog, wiki,

or  bulletin  board;

http://www.bookdivas.com  uses

bulletin  board  format.  Extra  features:  online

author visits, contests, quizzes, surveys, author

visits.  This  club  features  40  topics,  with  well

over 1100 posts on the Twilight Saga; the dis-

cussion on Tamora Pierce has over 109 posts,

but over 23,000 views.

  • Year-long 8th-grade class wiki—

http://tiny

url.com/wiki8

  • Online discussion of book award nominees—

http://nutmegteen2009.sblc.wikispaces.net

  • Thoughtful Threads: Sparking Rich Online

Discussions—ReadWriteThink lesson at

http://tinyurl.com/RWTDiscuss

  • Literature Circle Roles Reframed: Reading

as a Film Crew—ReadWriteThink lesson at

http://tinyurl.com/RWTFilmCrew

Book reviews

  • Student book recommendations including

reading excerpts—http://voicethread.

com/#q+book+talks.b312897.i1659896

  • Student video book talks—

http://professor-

marvel.com/podcast/labels/booktalk.html

  • YA Reading Challenge—links to booklists

read by registered participants—http://tiny

url.com/jkayebookblog

  • Post a book review—

http://teacher.scholastic.

com/activities/swyar/write.asp

  • Tips for writing a book review with Rodman

Philbrick—http://teacher.scholastic.com/

writewit/bookrev/index.htm

  • Post your virtual bookshelf, with ratings and

reviews, and share with friends—www.

shelfari.com

  • Online literary character role-play (Creating

Character Blogs)—ReadWriteThink lesson

plan at http://tinyurl.com/characterblog;

The

Outsiders

—http://theoutsiderssfa.ning.com

Book Trailers

  • Resources for Teachers—

http://www.mcte.org/

journal/mej09/Hayes.pdf

  • University-produced K–12 book trailers—

http://digitalbooktalk.com

  • 2007 Kirkus Award-winning trailer—

The

Alchemyst: The Secrets of the Immortal Nicholas

Flamel

at http://secondaryworlds.com/?page_

id=349. (University film students are invited

to enter.)

  • Trailers by teens:

Uglies

—www.youtube.com/watch?v=

0wLfJ-ahqNE

Hunger Games

—www.youtube.com/

watch?v=xlr3Y3dj37E (includes a dream

cast)

Lightning Thief

—www.youtube.com/

watch?v=kya9bPGEWXo

Dream cast for

The Alchemyst

and

The

Magician

—http://www.youtube.com/

watch?v=hp0hHP9iKjA

  • Have You Seen the Movie Yet? Filming a

scene from a favorite moment in the book—

ReadWriteThink lesson at http://tinyurl.

com/RWTFilmCrew

Podcasts

  • Author interviews and short story readings:

The Book Report 2.0—Book podcasts by

the students of Robert Rozema at http://

secondaryworlds.com/?page_id=349

Author sites

Many  authors  have  blogs,  MySpace,  Facebook,

and Twitter sites:

  • Kaleb Nation’s blog—

http://www.kalebnation.com,

a technology-rich, quirky site

  • Scott Westerfeld’s blog—

http://scottwester

feld.com/blog

  • Laurie Halse Anderson:
  • website—

http://www.writerlady.com

  • blog—

http://halseanderson.livejournal.

com

  • Facebook—

http://www.facebook.com/laurie

halseanderson

  • Anderson reads a powerful poem she

composed of excerpts from letters about

Speak

—www.youtube.com/watch?v=ic1c_

MaAMOI

m50-52_May10_VM.indd   51

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t e c h n o l o g y   t o o l k i t

|  Making the Shift: YA Lit 2.0

page

52

Voices from the Middle

, Volume 17 Number 4, May 2010

Fan sites

  • Twilight

http://bellaandedward.com

http://www.twilightguy.com—Kaleb Nation

gives a guy’s perspective

  • Shiver

http://thecrookedshelf.com

http://www.shiverguy.com

—another Kaleb

Nation project

Some publisher websites with special features

for teens

  • Sourcebook, Inc—

http://teenfire.ning.com

  • Candlewick Press—

http://tinyurl.com/

candlewickpress

  • Penguin Books—http://yabookscentral.

blogspot.com

  • Simon and Schuster—

http://teen.simonand

schuster.com

  • Scholastic—Author interviews and readings:

http://tinyurl.com/ScholasticVid

Fanfic—spin-off stories written by fans

1998, it currently hosts millions of stories,

including

Twilight

(134,927);

Artemis Fowl

(3,836);

Gossip Girl

(6,055);

Goosebumps

(267);

Hunger Games

(859);

Maximum Ride

(9,011)

http://www.waynesthisandthat.com/tensteps.htm—

Tips for writing fanfic

YA novels concerning social technologies

  • Very LeFreak

, by Rachel Cohn. Very

LeFreak is a crazed technology addict—

2009 Kirkus Award-winning trailer at www.

youtube.com/watch?v=-OxDa1fl2t0

  • Technology Detox videos by Rachel Cohn—

http://www.youtube.com/user/verylefreak

  • ReadWriteThink podcast about novels in the

form of emails, blog entries, instant messages

—http://tinyurl.com/technovels

The  key  to  the  success  of  YA  Lit  2.0  activities

in classrooms is not the technology alone; if the

activities  are  meaningful,  authentic,  and  socially

engaging, such as the activities cited here, school-

work  and  out-of-school  activity  will  morph  to-

gether. Now that’s what I call a shift!

m50-52_May10_VM.indd   52

3/30/10   5:02 PM

 

1

t e c h n o l o g y   t o o l k i t  |  Making the Shift: YA Lit 2.0page50Voices from the Middle, Volume 17 Number 4, May 2010Sandy Hayes, editort e c h n o l o g y   t o o l k i tMaking the Shift: YA Lit 2.0Web 1.0: InformationThe  early  Internet  revolutionized  teachers’  ac-cess  to  information  and  to  each  other.  In  1995, Kathy  Schrock  began  her  Guide  for  Educators website, an extensive hotlist of links to education resources. In the same year, Bernie Dodge pub-lished  his  WebQuest  website,  sending  students out into the Internet on investigative missions. YA Lit 1.0Carol  Hurst’s  Children’s  Literature  Site,  which made its debut in 1996, provided English teach-ers primarily with lesson plans or extensive Cliff Notes™-style information on authors and young adult  literature  (for  example,  Cynthia  Kado- hata, Kira-Kira, http://www.carolhurst.com/titles/kira-kira.html). Official author websites were primar-ily  academic  and  impersonal  (see  Lois  Lowery, http://tinyurl.com/llowry).  For  its  time,  Web-Quests  were  inno-vative,  adding  opportunities for collaboration while learning Web navigation and website evaluation. But by today’s standards, many of the early WebQuests were highly struc-tured worksheet-like activities that concentrated on knowledge-level thinking (refer to Characters in The  Sorcerer’s  Stone,  http://tinyurl.com/hp2 webquest).Web 1.5: InteractionBy 1999, blogs, a tool evolved from Web forums and  bulletin  boards,  rapidly  became  popular. Wikis followed soon after. These venues offered more opportunity for authentic, collaborative in-teractions.  Websites  began  to  contain  more  in-teractivity  and  multimedia.  With  support  from Verizon,   NCTE/IRA   began ReadWriteThink.org,  publishing  classroom-tested,  peer-reviewed lesson  plans.  Teachers  designed  literary  road trips using Google maps. Lit trips for titles such as Walk Two Moons, Fever 1793, Hana’s Suitcase, and Brothers in Hope: Lost Boys of Sudan were pub-lished at http://www.googlelittrips.org.YA Lit 1.5 Author  websites  and  blogs  added  more  person-alized  features  (photos,  fan  responses,  resources for  teachers,  daily  life,  observations).  Some  ex-amples: Cynthia Kadohata, Kira-Kira—www.kira-kira.us The Sorcerer’s Stone—www.scholastic.com/harrypotter/books/stone Lois Lowery— http://loislowry.typepad.comBlogs about young adult literature featuring book reviews, interviews, author news: http://www.kidlitosphere.org/bloggershttp://professornana.livejournal.comTeacher blog example: http://thereadingzone.wordpress.com/ 2010/02Web 2.0: InnovationIn 2004, the advent of social networking, podcast and video-sharing sites, and the ease of mashups enriched the multimedia content of the Web and created a culture of freewheeling, innovative par-ticipation. Many of these innovative sites offered special  prices  and  privacy  features  directed  at K–12 education. Websites increasingly provided engaging  and  creative  content,  including  video, games,  podcasts,  mashups,  and  content  created by readers. m50-52_May10_VM.indd   503/30/10   5:02 PM

page51Voices from the Middle, Volume 17 Number 4, May 2010t e c h n o l o g y   t o o l k i t  |  Making the Shift: YA Lit 2.0YA Lit 2.0Discussion about books•   Online Book Club—Create with blog, wiki, or  bulletin  board; http://www.bookdivas.com  uses bulletin  board  format.  Extra  features:  online author visits, contests, quizzes, surveys, author visits.  This  club  features  40  topics,  with  well over 1100 posts on the Twilight Saga; the dis-cussion on Tamora Pierce has over 109 posts, but over 23,000 views.•   Year-long 8th-grade class wiki—http://tinyurl.com/wiki8•   Online discussion of book award nominees—http://nutmegteen2009.sblc.wikispaces.net•   Thoughtful Threads: Sparking Rich Online Discussions—ReadWriteThink lesson at http://tinyurl.com/RWTDiscuss •   Literature Circle Roles Reframed: Reading as a Film Crew—ReadWriteThink lesson at http://tinyurl.com/RWTFilmCrewBook reviews•   Student book recommendations including reading excerpts—http://voicethread.com/#q+book+talks.b312897.i1659896•   Student video book talks—http://professor-marvel.com/podcast/labels/booktalk.html•   YA Reading Challenge—links to booklists read by registered participants—http://tinyurl.com/jkayebookblog•   Post a book review—http://teacher.scholastic.com/activities/swyar/write.asp•   Tips for writing a book review with Rodman Philbrick—http://teacher.scholastic.com/writewit/bookrev/index.htm•   Post your virtual bookshelf, with ratings and reviews, and share with friends—www. shelfari.com•   Online literary character role-play (Creating Character Blogs)—ReadWriteThink lesson plan at http://tinyurl.com/characterblog; The Outsiders—http://theoutsiderssfa.ning.comBook Trailers•   Resources for Teachers—www.mcte.org/journal/mej09/Hayes.pdf•   University-produced K–12 book trailers—http://digitalbooktalk.com•   2007 Kirkus Award-winning trailer—The Alchemyst: The Secrets of the Immortal Nicholas Flamel at http://secondaryworlds.com/?page_id=349. (University film students are invited to enter.)•   Trailers by teens:Uglies—www.youtube.com/watch?v= 0wLfJ-ahqNEHunger Games—www.youtube.com/watch?v=xlr3Y3dj37E (includes a dream cast)Lightning Thief—www.youtube.com/watch?v=kya9bPGEWXoDream cast for The Alchemyst and The Magician—http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hp0hHP9iKjA•  Have You Seen the Movie Yet? Filming a scene from a favorite moment in the book—ReadWriteThink lesson at http://tinyurl.com/RWTFilmCrewPodcasts•   Author interviews and short story readings:  The Book Report 2.0—Book podcasts by the students of Robert Rozema at http://secondaryworlds.com/?page_id=349Author sites Many  authors  have  blogs,  MySpace,  Facebook, and Twitter sites:•   Kaleb Nation’s blog—www.kalebnation.com, a technology-rich, quirky site•   Scott Westerfeld’s blog—http://scottwesterfeld.com/blog•   Laurie Halse Anderson:    •  website—www.writerlady.com   •  blog—http://halseanderson.livejournal.com   •  Facebook—www.facebook.com/lauriehalseanderson   •  Anderson reads a powerful poem she composed of excerpts from letters about Speak—www.youtube.com/watch?v=ic1c_MaAMOIm50-52_May10_VM.indd   513/30/10   5:02 PM

t e c h n o l o g y   t o o l k i t  |  Making the Shift: YA Lit 2.0page52Voices from the Middle, Volume 17 Number 4, May 2010Fan sites•    Twilight http://bellaandedward.comwww.twilightguy.com—Kaleb Nation gives a guy’s perspective •    Shiverhttp://thecrookedshelf.comwww.shiverguy.com —another Kaleb  Nation project Some publisher websites with special features for teens•   Sourcebook, Inc—http://teenfire.ning.com •   Candlewick Press—http://tinyurl.com/candlewickpress•   Penguin Books—http://yabookscentral.blogspot.com•   Simon and Schuster—http://teen.simonandschuster.com•   Scholastic—Author interviews and readings: http://tinyurl.com/ScholasticVidFanfic—spin-off stories written by fans•   http://www.fanfiction.net/book—Created in 1998, it currently hosts millions of stories, including Twilight (134,927); Artemis Fowl(3,836); Gossip Girl (6,055); Goosebumps (267); Hunger Games (859); Maximum Ride (9,011)•  http://www.waynesthisandthat.com/tensteps.htm—Tips for writing fanficYA novels concerning social technologies•    Very LeFreak, by Rachel Cohn. Very LeFreak is a crazed technology addict—2009 Kirkus Award-winning trailer at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-OxDa1fl2t0• Technology Detox videos by Rachel Cohn—www.youtube.com/user/verylefreak•   ReadWriteThink podcast about novels in the form of emails, blog entries, instant messages —http://tinyurl.com/technovelsThe  key  to  the  success  of  YA  Lit  2.0  activities in classrooms is not the technology alone; if the activities  are  meaningful,  authentic,  and  socially engaging, such as the activities cited here, school-work  and  out-of-school  activity  will  morph  to-gether. Now that’s what I call a shift!m50-52_May10_VM.indd   523/30/10   5:02 PM

 

 

 
 

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