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Commercial Aviation Management Functions

21 Mar

 

 

 

Module Study Guide

Academic Year 2017-2018

 

Commercial Aviation Management Functions

Location: St Mary’s Road, Ealing

 

 

 

Module Code: TH60056E
Level: 6
Credits: 20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Version No 01 © UWL 2017

 

 

 

Table of Contents

Full Title of Module highlight and type over the top (up to 2 lines) 1

  1. Module Leader, Teaching and Support Team Details. 3
  2. Other Key Contacts. 4
  3. Key Information. 5
  4. Welcome to the Module. 6
  5. Timetable/Venue/Rooms. 6
  6. Aims of the Module. 6
  7. Learning Outcomes. 6
  8. Content of the Module. 7
  9. Learning Resources. 7
  10. Reading List 7
  11. Assessment: General Information. 9
  12. Details of Assessment 9

Assessment 1. 9

Assessment 2. 10

  1. Summative Assessment Grid. 11
  2. External Examiner(s) 12
  3. Statement on Plagiarism.. 12
  4. Evaluation of the Module. 13
  5. Personal Development Plan (PDP) 13
  6. If You Have an Issue. 13
  7. Drop-in Support Service and Engagement Team Services. 14
  8. Guide to Learning Sessions. 16

Session number: 16

Session number: 16

Session number: 17

Session number: 17

Session number: 18

Session number: 18

Session number: 18

Session number: 19

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Session number: 20

Session number: 20

Session number: 21

Appendix. 22

 

  1. Module Leader, Teaching and Support Team Details

 

 

Module Leader George Arbuckle
Subject and School/College Aviation, Tourism and Events

London Geller College of Hospitality and Tourism

Email george.arbuckle@uwl.ac.uk
Phone 020 8231
Location WK. 01

 

 

Name James Goodman
Job title Lecturer
Email James.goodman@uwl.ac.uk
Phone n/a
Location WK.01

 

 

Academic Support Librarian James Concannon
Job title Academic Support Librarian
Email james.concannon@uwl.ac.uk
Phone 020 8231 2251
Location PE.02.007

 

 

Course Administrator Tajinder Sidhu
Job title Course Administrator
Email tajinder.sidhu@uwl.ac.uk
Phone 020 8231 2225
Location Heartspace Admin – SMR

 

  1. Other Key Contacts

 

The key contacts for your course are set out below:

 

The Course Leader responsible for this module is Ash Mistry, and can be contacted at ash.mistry@uwl.ac.uk

 

The Head of Subject responsible for this module is Anil Padhra, and can be contacted at anil.padhra@uwl.ac.uk

 

The Head of School/College/Dean of College responsible for this module is James Edmunds, and can be contacted at james.edmunds@uwl.ac.uk

 

 

  1. Key Information
Total Guided Learning Hours 200
Consisting of:  
Teaching Contact Hours 56
Independent Study Hours 144
Placement Hours 0
   
Assessment:  
Percentage of final marks assessed by:  
Exam 0%
Coursework 50%
Practical 50%
   

 

 

 

Due Dates:  
Assessments for this module are due on the following dates:

 

Assessment 1: 29th March 2018

 

Assessment 2: 10th May 2018

 
   

 

 

 

Section

A

 

Overview and Content

  1. Welcome to the Module

 

Welcome to the Commercial Aviation Management Functions (CAMF) module. Please read this Module Study Guide (MSG) carefully as it contains all the information about the module, the teaching and learning plan and the assignments.

 

This module will look at examining and developing your knowledge surrounding a range of commercial aviation management functions appropriate to the airline & airport industry. The module examines how classical economic theory applies to the aviation industry and how management decisions are made accordingly. The module builds on upon knowledge gained in the first and second year of the degree programme and allows for the development of practical work related skills appropriate to a career in the airline, airport and tourism industry.

 

  1. Timetable/Venue/Rooms

 

You are timetabled 4 hours per week of contact time with a module tutor for 14 weeks. This equates to a total of 56 hours of contact time. You are expected to attend all sessions, to ensure that you can benefit from the interaction with others and from continuity of the sessions.

The 4 hours of contact time includes a 2 hour lecture which is designated for the formal delivery of a lecture topic/s and a 2-hour seminar which is used to enhance your learning experience relating to the lecture topic/s and give opportunities to research assessments.

All students are timetabled to attend the following lecture session:

Lecture            – Thursday – 09:00 to 11:00 – WK.01.014

All students are timetabled to attend one of the following seminar sessions:

Seminar           – Thursday – 11:00 to 13:00 – WK.03.002

  • Thursday – 13:00 to 15:00 – WK.03.002
  • Thursday – 13:00 to 15:00 – BY.02.024

 

Apart from in-class learning, you are encouraged to plan additional study time for reading around the topic areas introduced and assessments for this module. The remaining 144 hours will consist of private study and will include the following:

  • Reading of MSG
  • Preparation for each class
  • Reading for each class
  • Research and preparation of assessments
  • Blackboard activities and tasks

 

  1. Aims of the Module

 

  1. To define the principles of demand and supply theory for aviation.
  2. To examine the theories of pricing and aviation operating costs.
  3. To explore the development of new pricing strategies – including yield management and the impact of such techniques to both operator and customer.
  4. To highlight forecasting modules utilised by the commercial aviation sector.
  5. To introduce route network theory.
  6. To examine the effects of aircraft scheduling on airlines, airports and passengers.

 

  1. Learning Outcomes

 

  1. Understand the economics of commercial aviation and the impact of yield management for airlines on cost and load factor.
  2. Understand the Strategic Choices available to commercial airlines (traditional, new modal airlines and charter operators).
  3. Identify the main cost factors for commercial aviation suppliers.
  4. Record the use of forecasting models by airline and airport operators.
  5. Understand route network theory and its impact on aircraft scheduling.

 

  1. Content of the Module

 

See Session Details

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Learning Resources

 

As with other modules on the airline and airport management course a wide range of teaching techniques are utilised. The use of lectures and seminars provides the backbone to student’s in-class learning. The main theories are addressed in the lecture and are then picked up within the seminar via group discussions, presentations and via study activities to help develop the concepts further. The above helps build students evaluation, problem-solving and communication skills. A wide range of books and journals are available in the Library. Students are also expected to read paper and online news articles, throughout the module, to keep up-to-date with current affairs in the aviation industry.

  1. Reading List

 

The reading list for this module is given below and is also available on Blackboard in the module area or by searching https://uwl.rl.talis.com/index.html. This shows real-time availability of books in the library catalogue and direct links to online resources.

 

Special online support guides  (http://www.uwl.ac.uk/library/finding-and-using-information/subject-guides-libguides) for the subject are also available to help you find relevant information for assignments, with contact details of the Academic Support Librarian for your subject.

 

  • Abdelghany, A. and Abdelghany, K. (2010) Modeling applications in the Airline Industry. Farnham: Ashgate (e-book)
  • Barnhart, C., Odoni, A. R. and Belobaba, P. (2009) The Global Airline Industry. Oxford: Whiley-Blackwell
  • Clark, P. (2007) Buying the Big Jets. Hampshire: Ashgate Doganis, R. (2006) The Airline Business. London: Routledge (e-book)
  • Doganis, R. (2010) Flying Off Course. 4 th ed. London: Routledge (e-book)
  • Flouris, T. and Oswald, S. (2006) Designing and Executing Strategy in Aviation Management. Hampshire: Ashgate
  • Flouris, T. G. and Lock, D. (2008) Aviation Project Management. Aldershot: Ashgate (e-book)
  • Hill, C. and Jones, G. (2008) Strategic Management Theory: An Integrated Approach. 9th ed. Mason: South-Western Cengage Learning
  • Hitt, M. A., Ireland, D. and Hoskisson, R. E. (2011) Strategic Management: Competitiveness and Globalization: Concepts. 9th ed. Mason: South-Western Cengage Learning
  • Holloway, S. (2008) Straight and Level. Hampshire: Ashgate (e-book)
  • Papatheodorou, A. (ed.) (2006) Corporate Rivalry and Market Power: Competition Issues in the Tourism Industry. London: IB Tauris
  • Shaw, S. (2011) Airline Marketing and Management. 7th ed. Hampshire: Ashgate
  • Vasigh, B., Fleming, K. and Tacker, T. (2008) Introduction to air transport economics: from theory to applications. Aldershot: Ashgate
  • Wensveen, J. (2007) Wheels Up – Airline Business Plan Development. London: Krieger
  • Wensveen, J. (2015) Air Transportation: A Management Perspective.8th ed. Hampshire: Ashgate
  • Williams, G. and O’Connell, J. F. (2011) Air Transport in the 21st Century: Key strategic developments. Farnham: Ashgate (e-book)

 

Other Learning Resources (Journals, Websites):

 

Journals and Industry Magazines

 

  • Journal of Transport Geography
  • Journal of Air Transport Management
  • Journal of Transport Management
  • Journal of Air Transport Studies
  • Airline Business
  • Flight International
  • Travel Trade Gazette

 

Aviation & Government Organisations

 

  • iata.org – IATA (International Air Transport Association)
  • icao.org – ICAO (International Civil Aviation Organisation)
  • aci.aero – Airports International
  • wttc.org – The World Travel & Tourism Council (WTTC)
  • centreforaviation.com – Airline Analysis
  • unwto.org – The World Tourism Organization (WTO)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Section

B

 

Assessment and Feedback

  1. Assessment: General Information

 

The assessment methods designed for this module will be in two parts taken throughout the semester. Students must attempt all assessments for this module. The assessment plan for this module will be addressed in the first week’s lecture, the assessment briefs are detailed below. Assessment 1 has a defined hand-in date. Any late assessments handed-in within 5 working days after the hand-in date will be marked, however the mark will be capped at a maximum of 40%.

 

Each assessment has a pass mark of 40%. The overall pass mark for the whole module is 40%. If the overall pass mark is not achieved after attempting all assessments, students will be given a chance to be re-assessed. However, all marks are capped at the pass rate of 40% weighting. For non-submission of assessment/s, re-assessment will be subject to exam board decision and students may have to re-enrol for this module.

 

All work will be marked as far as possible in accordance with the University’s policy on anonymous marking.

 

 

 

 

  1. Details of Assessment

 

Assessment 1

Assessment task: Commercial Report

 

Weighting:             50%

 

Date/time/method of submission:

 

The report submission due date is Tuesday 27th March 2018 at 23:59. You must submit the report via Blackboard Turnitin.

 

Word count or equivalent: 1500 words (+/- 10%)

 

Assessment brief:

 

Organisations in the aviation industry are often operating in a climate of intense competition; this applies to both airline and airport sectors of the industry. It is regularly the role of aviation consultants to critically analyse financial and other key industry metrics of an airline or airport to fully understand their market position, strengths and weaknesses. Analysis of such data enables the consultancy firm to formulate strategic recommendations with appropriate forecasting.

 

As an aviation consultant, you have been tasked with critically analysing the commercial and operating performance of either one airport or one airline of your choice. Based on the findings of your analysis and research, you should formulate 2 to 3 strategic recommendations for your chosen airline or airport.

 

Your analysis should include considerable financial and numerical data which is displayed clearly and professionally. You are required to utilise relevant theoretical frameworks for your analysis and recommendations.

 

The calculations for this numerical data must be shown in the Appendices.

 

NB: It is advisable to contact your tutor when you choose your airline or airport, to clarify these are appropriate for this assignment.

 

 

Marking scheme:

 

  • 40% – Critical analysis (including strength of financial and numerical analysis) of chosen airline or airport
  • 20% – The use and integration of appropriate theoretical frameworks
  • 20% – Strength and appropriateness of strategic recommendations
  • 10% – Use of referencing in the Harvard format, including a references list in the Harvard format
  • 10% – Structure, word count, spelling, grammar and overall presentation

 

Timing and methods of feedback:

 

Written Feedback will be provided within three working weeks of the report submission. Feedback will be available on BlackBoard and will consist of the mark achieved and a detailed set of written comments.

 

For guidance on online submission of assignments, including how to submit and how to access online feedback, please refer to the UWL Blackboard student help pages at:

http://www.uwl.ac.uk/blackboardhelp

 

 

 

 

Assessment 2

Assessment task: Group Presentation

 

Weighting:             50%

 

Date/time/method of submission:

 

You must submit your final presentation slides by 23:59 on Thursday 10th May 2018. The presentation slides must be submitted online via Blackboard Turnitin.

 

You will conduct the presentation as a group in the week commencing 13th May 2018. A presentation schedule will published closer to the time.

 

Word count or equivalent: 10 minute presentation + 5 minutes of questions

 

Assessment brief:

 

You are part of a team looking to develop a route schedule for a new low-cost mid-haul airline based at Larnaca airport in Cyprus. You operate a fleet of four B737-900 aircraft and three B757-300 aircraft.

 

Working in a group of 4-5 students, you are to produce a 22 week summer schedule running from 30th April 2018 to 30th September 2018. Your airline brand is targeted at both business and leisure passengers, though you will not be carrying any freight or mail. The airline aims to use its geographical strength at Larnaca Airport to connect passengers between Europe and Asia. Prepare a presentation describing your proposed schedule. As part of the presentation, you need to justify in detail the design of your schedule. You are trying to produce a schedule that is operationally achievable, will generate significant revenue and is also cost-efficient.

 

Your presentation must include:

 

  • an analysis of the competition
  • the commercial/demand justification
  • social and political considerations
  • an explanation of cost considerations
  • an explanation of technical constraints

 

All members of the group must actively participate in the presentation.

Marking scheme:

 

  • 15% – Competitive Analysis
  • 20% – Commercial Justification
  • 20% – Cost Considerations
  • 20% – Operational/technical feasibility
  • 10% – Quality of the presentation
  • 15% – Response to questions

 

Timing and methods of feedback:

 

Written Feedback will be provided within three working weeks of the presentation. Feedback will be available on BlackBoard to all group members and will consist of the mark achieved and a detailed set of written comments.

 

For guidance on online submission of assignments, including how to submit and how to access online feedback, please refer to the UWL Blackboard student help pages at:

http://www.uwl.ac.uk/blackboardhelp

 

 

  1. Summative Assessment Grid

 

Type of assessment Module learning outcome(s) Word count or equivalent Due date and time Threshold (if applicable) Pass mark Weighting Date assignment feedback will be made available to student
Commercial Report 1,2,3 1500 words (+/- 10%) 23:59 on Thursday 29th March 2018 n/a 40% 50% Thursday 19th April 2018
Group Presentation 4,5 10 minutes + 5 minutes for questions Presentation slides to be submitted by 23:59 on Thursday 10th May 2018. Presentations take place w/c 13th May 2018. n/a 40% 50% Thursday 31st May 2018

 

 

 

  1. External Examiner(s)

The External Examiner is an independent academic staff member from another institution who provides assurance that the assessment system is fair and ensures that standards on the course are comparable to other institutions.

The External Examiner(s) for this module are listed below. Please note that this is provided for information only; students are not permitted to enter into any correspondence about their marks with External Examiners.

 

Name TBC
Job Title TBC
Institution TBC

 

 

  1. Statement on Plagiarism

 

You must ensure that all work you submit for assessment is your own and that you properly reference your sources. If you do not reference properly or if you copy other people’s work, that is plagiarism.

 

For advice on referencing please go to the UWL website:

http://www.uwl.ac.uk/library/finding-and-using-information/referencing

 

For advice on avoiding plagiarism please go to the UWL website: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/current-students/Advice-students-plagiarism

 

 

Plagiarism is defined as the practice of taking someone else’s work or ideas and passing them off as your own. It is the action of presenting someone else’s work as one’s own irrespective of intention. Close paraphrasing without adequate attribution; copying from the work of another person, including another student; using the ideas of another person without proper acknowledgement all constitute examples of plagiarism. In addition, the act of re-using work (whether in part or in whole) that you have previously submitted for graded assessment – at the University of West London or at another institution – without properly referencing yourself (known as ‘self-plagiarism’ ) also constitutes plagiarism.

 

For further information on plagiarism and other Academic Offences please refer to the Student Handbook Section 3 and the University Regulations.

 

 

  1. Evaluation of the Module

 

  1. i) Evaluation framework

Towards the end of the module you will be invited to provide some feedback to the module leader.  This will be through an online or paper survey and you will be given a few minutes in a taught session to complete it.  Please think carefully about the feedback you provide.  Constructive feedback will help your module leader understand your experience and help inform the development of the module.  If you have concerns about individual members of staff, these should be taken to your module or course leader whose details are in Section 2 of this guide rather than expressed through the survey.

 

  1. ii) Improvements made in response to student feedback

The course team has reviewed the assessment submission dates for this module to take into account the proximity other assessment submission dates from other modules.

 

  1. Personal Development Plan (PDP)

 

Students should use this module as a method of personal development to attain new skills and enhance existing skills so that they can be better positioned to attain a graduate job upon completion of the degree course.

 

The module seeks to enhance student’s understanding of basic economic principles in the context of the aviation industry. However, it should be noted that the knowledge of economic theory delivered as part of the module is also transferable to almost any other business or organisation. Therefore the module will prepare the student for almost any graduate role attained in the future.

 

The module assessments requires students to analyse numerical data to a greater extent than is required on other modules in the course. Students should therefore use the module as an opportunity to enhance their numerical skills and make this a core outcome in relation to their personal development plan.

 

In each of the weekly seminar lecture/sessions, some discussion of current affairs in the aviation industry take places. As part of these discussions, students should include in their personal development plan the development of skills to analyse the new stories in a balanced manner.

 

Finally, all students receive detailed assessment feedback for which students are strongly encouraged to read and reflect upon to identify how they can improve not only as part of their degree course but also once they find themselves in a graduate role, where the learning environment is often very different.

  1. If You Have an Issue

 

If you have an issue with the module or course you should speak to your personal tutor or Module Leader in the first instance. You could also speak to your Course Representative who will be able to raise it at a Course Committee which take place once each semester. You can also raise issues with your Course Leader. It is important that you raise matters as soon as possible so that they can be resolved.

 

If you have a complaint about the course you should raise this informally in the first instance with the Course Leader. If you are unable to resolve it informally, you should use the Complaints Procedure which is outlined in the Student Handbook.  You are also encouraged to contact the Students’ Union about it. The University aims to ensure that most issues are resolved informally but the Complaints Procedure is there to help you resolve issues if this is not the case.

 

  1. Drop-in Support Service and Engagement Team Services

 

Drop-in Support Service:

Offering academic and personal advice – Available daily.

One to one support is provided at drop-ins run by members of the drop-in support team. They offer guidance and support with any aspect of a student’s experience that is causing concern or confusion, academically or personally.

No appointment needed – Students are seen on a first come, first served basis.

Drop-ins are available daily at St Mary’s Road (Ealing site) and Paragon (Brentford site).

 

Drop-in Timetables are available by emailing:

drop-in.support@uwl.ac.uk

 

Peer Mentoring Service

Students Supporting Students

On-going support can also be provided by pairing a student with another student who is working at a level above them on the same course. Students interested in having a mentor, or becoming a mentor, should email: mentoring.service@uwl.ac.uk

 

Academic Skills Workshops

The UWL Student Engagement Team runs a series of academic skills workshops throughout the year. These range from how to write and plan an essay, time management advice, habits of successful writing, note taking, dissertation advice and much more.  Beginners’ tutorials on Microsoft Office are also provided. For information about the latest workshops on offer please contact engagement.team@uwl.ac.uk.

 

As well as individual booked appointments available throughout the year, your Academic Support Librarians offer a range of information skills workshops to help students find, evaluate and reference quality information for assignments, dissertations and projects. For more information about the latest workshops on offer go to http://www.uwl.ac.uk/library/library-services/skills-workshops

 

 

 

 

 

 

Section

C

 

 

  1. Guide to Learning Sessions

 

Session One
Topic Introduction to Aviation Economics
Key Concepts/Issues ·         Profit and loss equation

·         Quantifying the size of the aviation industry

·         Aviation’s economic contribution

·         Current economic challenges

Delivery Method Formal lecture followed by a seminar worksheet
Formative/summative assessment opportunities Worksheet solutions will enable formative assessment.
Essential reading for this session Barnhart, C., Odoni, A. R. and Belobaba, P. (2009) The Global Airline Industry. Oxford: Whiley-Blackwell
Recommended reading for this session Wensveen, J. (2015) Air Transportation: A Management Perspective.8th ed. Hampshire: Ashgate
Independent study Students to revise basic numerical calculations and apply the profit/loss equation to at least one self-selected airline/airport.
Reference to resources Airline/Airport Corporate websites

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Session Two
Topic Financial Analysis
Key Concepts/Issues ·         Key industry metrics

·         Financial statements

·         Financial ratio analysis

·         Interpreting financial performance

Delivery Method Formal lecture followed by a seminar worksheets
Formative/summative assessment opportunities Worksheet solutions will enable formative assessment.
Essential reading for this session Vasigh, B., Fleming, K. and Tacker, T. (2008) Introduction to air transport economics: from theory to applications. Aldershot: Ashgate
Recommended reading for this session Doganis, R. (2010) Flying Off Course. 4 th ed. London: Routledge (e-book)
Independent study Students to search for financial statements published online by at least one airline and practice calculating metrics and ratios.
Reference to resources Airline corporate websites

 

Session Three
Topic The Demand for Air Transport

– Part One

Key Concepts/Issues ·         Theory of supply and demand

·         Determinants of demand

·         Characteristics of demand

·         Revenue curve

Delivery Method Formal lecture followed by a seminar worksheets
Formative/summative assessment opportunities Worksheet solutions will enable formative assessment.
Essential reading for this session Holloway, S. (2008) Straight and Level. Hampshire: Ashgate (e-book)
Recommended reading for this session Barnhart, C., Odoni, A. R. and Belobaba, P. (2009) The Global Airline Industry. Oxford: Whiley-Blackwell
Independent study Students to read Holloway (2008), chapter 2 – Traffic.
Reference to resources Essential reading text

 

Session Four
Topic The Demand for Air Transport

– Part Two

Key Concepts/Issues ·         Equilibrium analysis

·         Demand functions

·         Price elasticity of demand

·         Revenue analysis

Delivery Method Formal lecture followed by a seminar worksheets
Formative/summative assessment opportunities Worksheet solutions will enable formative assessment.
Essential reading for this session Holloway, S. (2008) Straight and Level. Hampshire: Ashgate (e-book)
Recommended reading for this session Barnhart, C., Odoni, A. R. and Belobaba, P. (2009) The Global Airline Industry. Oxford: Whiley-Blackwell
Independent study Students to revise linear graph methods from GCSE mathematics and practise PED and revenue calculations
Reference to resources  

 

Session Five
Topic Forecasting and Analysis of Demand
Key Concepts/Issues ·         Qualitative forecasting

·         Quantitative forecasting

·         Load factor analysis

·         Sources of Data

Delivery Method Formal lecture followed by a seminar worksheets
Formative/summative assessment opportunities Worksheet solutions will enable formative assessment.
Essential reading for this session Abdelghany, A. and Abdelghany, K. (2010) Modeling applications in the Airline Industry. Farnham: Ashgate (e-book)
Recommended reading for this session Flouris, T. and Oswald, S. (2006) Designing and Executing Strategy in Aviation Management. Hampshire: Ashgate
Independent study Students to revise basic statistical calculations from GCSE mathematics. Students to practice completing the load factor analysis table.
Reference to resources  
Session Six
Topic The Supply of Air Transport
Key Concepts/Issues ·         Supply curve

·         Determinants of supply

·         Characteristics of supply

·         Equilibrium analysis

Delivery Method Formal lecture followed by a seminar worksheets
Formative/summative assessment opportunities Worksheet solutions will enable formative assessment.
Essential reading for this session Holloway, S. (2008) Straight and Level. Hampshire: Ashgate (e-book)
Recommended reading for this session Williams, G. and O’Connell, J. F. (2011) Air Transport in the 21st Century: Key strategic developments. Farnham: Ashgate (e-book)
Independent study Students to read Holloway (2008), chapter 4 – Output.
Reference to resources  

 

Session Seven
Topic Ticket Price Policy and Revenue Management
Key Concepts/Issues ·         Consumer surplus

·         Price differentiation

·         Price discrimination

·         Ticket price analysis

Delivery Method Formal lecture followed by a case-study and computer-based activity.
Formative/summative assessment opportunities None
Essential reading for this session Holloway, S. (2008) Straight and Level. Hampshire: Ashgate (e-book)
Recommended reading for this session Doganis, R. (2010) Flying Off Course. 4 th ed. London: Routledge (e-book)
Independent study Students to assess price variations on travel websites (e.g. Momondo). Students to read Doganis (2010), chapter 11 – Pricing for profit and Holloway (2008), chapter 9 – Revenue management.
Reference to resources  
Session Eight
Topic The Cost of Air Travel
Key Concepts/Issues ·         Direct/indirect costs

·         Economies of scale

·         Cost function

·         Cost analysis

Delivery Method Formal lecture followed by a seminar worksheets
Formative/summative assessment opportunities Worksheet solutions will enable formative assessment.
Essential reading for this session Holloway, S. (2008) Straight and Level. Hampshire: Ashgate (e-book)
Recommended reading for this session Doganis, R. (2010) Flying Off Course. 4 th ed. London: Routledge (e-book)
Independent study Students to research two airlines with different business models and compare operating costs.
Reference to resources  
Links to Blackboard  
   

 

Session Nine
Topic Cost Analysis and Control
Key Concepts/Issues ·         Cost and profit

·         Cost reduction

·         Cost of Delay

Delivery Method Formal lecture followed by a seminar worksheets.
Formative/summative assessment opportunities Worksheet solutions will enable formative assessment. Module tutor to respond to assessment queries.
Essential reading for this session Holloway, S. (2008) Straight and Level. Hampshire: Ashgate (e-book)
Recommended reading for this session University of Westminster Cost of Delay Report
Independent study Students to read Holloway (2008, chapter 5 – Unit Cost. Students to research cost reduction strategies for one major airline and airport.
Reference to resources  

 

Session Ten
Topic Route Development and Scheduling
Key Concepts/Issues ·         Point-to-point Traffic

·         Hub-and-spoke operations

·         Airport characteristics

·         Schedule development and validation.

Delivery Method Formal lecture followed by a seminar discussion
Formative/summative assessment opportunities None
Essential reading for this session Holloway, S. (2008) Straight and Level. Hampshire: Ashgate (e-book)
Recommended reading for this session Doganis, R. (2010) Flying Off Course. 4 th ed. London: Routledge (e-book)
Independent study Students to read Holloway (2008), chapters 6 and 7 on Network Management.
Reference to resources  

 

Session Eleven
Topic Aircraft Selection, Financing and Fleet Planning
Key Concepts/Issues ·         Aircraft performance specifications

·         Commercial decision making

·         Purchase, lease, sale & leaseback

·         Aircraft delivery

Delivery Method Formal lecture followed by a seminar discussion
Formative/summative assessment opportunities None
Essential reading for this session Clark, P. (2007) Buying the Big Jets. Hampshire: Ashgate Doganis, R. (2006) The Airline Business. London: Routledge (e-book)
Recommended reading for this session Holloway, S. (2008) Straight and Level. Hampshire: Ashgate (e-book)
Independent study Students to assess the financial report of one airline to evaluate their future fleet plan.
Reference to resources  

 

 

 

Session Twelve
Topic Airport and ATM Economics
Key Concepts/Issues ·         Aeronautical revenue

·         Non-aeronautical revenue

·         Airport charging structures

·         Navigation costs

Delivery Method Formal lecture followed by a seminar discussion
Formative/summative assessment opportunities None
Essential reading for this session Wensveen, J. (2015) Air Transportation: A Management Perspective.8th ed. Hampshire: Ashgate
Recommended reading for this session  
Independent study Students to assess and compare the revenues of one hub airport and one regional airport.
Reference to resources  

 

Session Thirteen and Fourteen
Topic Revision and Assessment Preparation
Key Concepts/Issues ·         Module overview

·         Demand analysis

·         Yield and revenue strategies

·         Output and cost analysis

Delivery Method Formal lecture followed by a review of worksheets
Formative/summative assessment opportunities Module tutor to be available to respond to assessment presentation queries.
Essential reading for this session As listed in Section 10
Recommended reading for this session As listed in Section 10
Independent study Students to review and revise past lecture notes and worksheets.
Reference to resources  

 

 

 
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Posted by on March 21, 2018 in academic writing, Academic Writing

 

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