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HWK #2 – Outline of Literary Response Task Description

21 Oct

HWK #2 – Outline of Literary Response                                                                                              Task Description

 

Write the outline of a literary response. (I’m not asking you to write the essay for now. Just the outline, as if you were preparing to write the essay. But don’t write the essay.)                                                                                                                         

Send your outline (Portail or Drive)no later than Friday 20October.

 

Collège François de Laval Name                                                               Oct. 2017ELA536                                                              Outline of Literary Response

Thesis statement: (Book title; chosen element; hypothesis)

Point #1 (one summary sentence)

Point #2 (one summary sentence)

Point #3 (one summary sentence)

Point #4 (one summary sentence if necessary)

Conclusion (one summary sentence)

 

  1. Choose a novel of recognized literary merit (any language);
  2. Formulate a hypothesis about an element (character, setting, plot, event, style, theme, symbol, quotation, motif, title, etc.) of said novel;

Ex.: “Star Wars is a rewriting of the Bible.”;

  1. Write an outline of your essay in which youargue, prove, demonstrate, document, your hypothesis.

 

 

 

When writing a Literary Response you should:

  1. First carefully read the excerpt/poem/novel/play/etc. (ideally at least twice) before you attempt to write about it;
  2. Establish one of the themes of the work (or focus on a character or any major element of the work) and form an opinion about it;
  3. Begin formatting your essay by establishing your topic and argument concerning this topic. Both of these things should go in your thesis statement (your hypothesis);
  4. Create a rough draft of your thesis and then proceed to format the rest of your paper. Make sure that each body paragraph ties back into your thesis and contains evidence from the piece of literature;
  5. Finish with your concluding paragraph. Make sure to restate the points that you mentioned in the thesis statement and end the essay by answering the “so what?” question;
  6. Review, revise, and rewrite. Then, turn it in.

 

 

Note #1: Your hypothesis does not have to be something the author has mentioned, or discussed, or approved of, or explained when discussing his or her work. It’s yours and yours alone.

Note #2: You may not use a movie, nor a song, as the basis for your literary response.

Note #3: Before you start writing your outline, discuss your choice with me. The risk you run if you don’t is that you might have to start over if, in my judgement, it’s not a literary response.

 

 

Beware:

  1. Not a summary. Do not write asummary.
  2. Not a review (critique). Do not write a review.

 

 

Suggested topics

  1. Choose one character from a novel of literary merit. Then write an essay in which you show how this character’s struggles are universal (they apply to all of us), and are not merely constrained or limited to the events described in the novel. Explain how the issue contributes to the meaning of the work as a whole. Do not merely summarize the plot.
  2. Choose one object from a novel of literary merit. Then write an essay in which you show how this object symbolizes (represents) a universal value or struggle or issue (one we can all recognize or to which we can all relate in our own reality), and that is not merely constrained or limited to the events described in the novel. Explain how the issue contributes to the meaning of the work as a whole. Do not merely summarize the plot.
  3. Focus on an event or series of events in a novel of literary merit and explain how it, or they, act as a parallel, or parody, or allegory, or a critique of, our present-day society, or society at the time the novel was published. Explain how the issue contributes to the meaning of the work as a whole. Do not merelysummarize the plot.

 

 

 

 
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Posted by on October 21, 2017 in Academic Writing

 

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