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WRG 101 Quiz #1

17 Jun

Question 1 (1 point)

Please select the item that does not have any run-on sentences or sentence fragments.

Question 1 options:

a) Getting a new idea adopted, even when it has obvious advantages, is difficult.  Many innovations require a lengthy period of many years from the time when they become available to the time when they are widely adopted, therefore a common problem for many individuals and organizations is how to speed up the rate of diffusion of an innovation.
b) Getting a new idea adopted, even when it has obvious advantages, is difficult.  Many innovations require a lengthy period of many years from the time when they become available.  To the time when they are widely adopted.  Therefore, a common problem for many individuals and organizations is how to speed up the rate of diffusion of an innovation.
c) Getting a new idea adopted, even when it has obvious advantages, is difficult, many innovations require a lengthy period of many years from the time when they become available to the time when they are widely adopted.  Therefore, a common problem for many individuals and organizations is how to speed up the rate of diffusion of an innovation.
d) Getting a new idea adopted, even when it has obvious advantages, is difficult.  Many innovations require a lengthy period of many years from the time when they become available to the time when they are widely adopted.  Therefore, a common problem for many individuals and organizations is how to speed up the rate of diffusion of an innovation.

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Question 2 (1 point)

Please select the item that does not have any run-on sentences or sentence fragments.

Question 2 options:

a) Most individuals who write on a computer do not realize that their fingers tap out words on a keyboard that is known as QWERTY.  Named after the first six keys on the upper row of letters.  The QWERTY keyboard is intentionally inefficient and awkward.  This keyboard takes twice as long to learn as it should and makes us work about twenty times harder than necessary, but QWERTY has persisted since 1873, and today unsuspecting individuals are taught to use the QWERTY keyboard, unaware that a much more efficient keyboard is available.
b) Most individuals who write on a computer do not realize that their fingers tap out words on a keyboard that is known as QWERTY, named after the first six keys on the upper row of letters.  The QWERTY keyboard is intentionally inefficient and awkward, this keyboard takes twice as long to learn as it should and makes us work about twenty times harder than necessary.  But QWERTY has persisted since 1873, and today unsuspecting individuals are taught to use the QWERTY keyboard, unaware that a much more efficient keyboard is available.
c) Most individuals who write on a computer do not realize that their fingers tap out words on a keyboard that is known as QWERTY, named after the first six keys on the upper row of letters.  The QWERTY keyboard is intentionally inefficient and awkward.  This keyboard takes twice as long to learn as it should and makes us work about twenty times harder than necessary.  But QWERTY has persisted since 1873, and today unsuspecting individuals are taught to use the QWERTY keyboard, unaware that a much more efficient keyboard is available.
d) Most individuals who write on a computer do not realize that their fingers tap out words on a keyboard that is known as QWERTY, named after the first six keys on the upper row of letters.  The QWERTY keyboard is intentionally inefficient and awkward.  This keyboard takes twice as long to learn as it should and makes us work about twenty times harder than necessary.  But QWERTY has persisted since 1873, and today unsuspecting individuals are taught to use the QWERTY keyboard.  Unaware that a much more efficient keyboard is available.

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Question 3 (1 point)

Please select the item that does not have any run-on sentences or sentence fragments.

Question 3 options:

a) QWERTY was invented by Christopher Latham Sholes, who designed this keyboard to slow down typists.  In his day, the type bars on a typewriter hung down in a sort of basket and pivoted up to strike the paper, then they fell back into place by gravity.  When two adjoining keys were struck rapidly in succession, they jammed.  Sholes rearranged the keys on a typewriter to minimize such jamming.
b) QWERTY was invented by Christopher Latham Sholes, who designed this keyboard to slow down typists.  In his day, the type bars on a typewriter hung down in a sort of basket and pivoted up to strike the paper; then they fell back into place by gravity.  When two adjoining keys were struck rapidly in succession.  They jammed.  Sholes rearranged the keys on a typewriter to minimize such jamming.
c) QWERTY was invented by Christopher Latham Sholes, who designed this keyboard to slow down typists.  In his day, the type bars on a typewriter hung down in a sort of basket and pivoted up to strike the paper; then they fell back into place by gravity.  When two adjoining keys were struck rapidly in succession, they jammed, Sholes rearranged the keys on a typewriter to minimize such jamming.
d) QWERTY was invented by Christopher Latham Sholes, who designed this keyboard to slow down typists.  In his day, the type bars on a typewriter hung down in a sort of basket and pivoted up to strike the paper; then they fell back into place by gravity.  When two adjoining keys were struck rapidly in succession, they jammed.  Sholes rearranged the keys on a typewriter to minimize such jamming.

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Question 4 (1 point)

Please select the item that does not have any run-on sentences or sentence fragments.

Question 4 options:

a) The search for an improved design was led by Professor August Dvorak at the University of Washington, who in 1932 used time-and-motion studies to create a much more efficient keyboard arrangement, Dvorak filmed people while they were typing and spent a decade analyzing which operations slowed them down.
b) The search for an improved design was led by Professor August Dvorak at the University of Washington.  Who in 1932 used time-and-motion studies to create a much more efficient keyboard arrangement.  Dvorak filmed people while they were typing and spent a decade analyzing which operations slowed them down.
c) The search for an improved design was led by Professor August Dvorak at the University of Washington, who in 1932 used time-and-motion studies to create a much more efficient keyboard arrangement.  Dvorak filmed people while they were typing and spent a decade analyzing which operations slowed them down.
d) The search for an improved design was led by Professor August Dvorak at the University of Washington, who in 1932 used time-and-motion studies to create a much more efficient keyboard arrangement, Dvorak filmed people while they were typing and spent a decade analyzing which operations slowed them down.

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Question 5 (1 point)

Please select the item that does not have any run-on sentences or sentence fragments.

Question 5 options:

a) The Dvorak keyboard is much more efficient for typists than the QWERTY keyboard, which was designed more than a century ago to slow down typists so as to prevent the jamming of keys on early typewriters.  Yet almost no one has adopted the Dvorak keyboard.  Superior technological innovations do not necessarily diffuse themselves.
b) The Dvorak keyboard is much more efficient for typists than the QWERTY keyboard, which was designed more than a century ago to slow down typists so as to prevent the jamming of keys on early typewriters, however, almost no one has adopted the Dvorak keyboard.  Superior technological innovations do not necessarily diffuse themselves.
c) The Dvorak keyboard is much more efficient for typists than the QWERTY keyboard, which was designed more than a century ago to slow down typists so as to prevent the jamming of keys on early typewriters.  Yet almost no one has adopted the Dvorak keyboard, superior technological innovations do not necessarily diffuse themselves.
d) The Dvorak keyboard is much more efficient for typists than the QWERTY keyboard.  Which was designed more than a century ago to slow down typists so as to prevent the jamming of keys on early typewriters.  Yet almost no one has adopted the Dvorak keyboard.  Superior technological innovations do not necessarily diffuse themselves.

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Question 6 (1 point)

Please select the item that does not have any run-on sentences or sentence fragments.

Question 6 options:

a) In the early 1990s, the California and Arizona state governments mandated that at least 10 percent of the total sales of automobiles would have to be nonpolluting.  Which meant that they would have to be electric vehicles or some combination of electric/gasoline vehicles.  The purpose was to determine smog levels in cities such as Los Angeles and Phoenix.
b) In the early 1990s, the California and Arizona state governments mandated that at least 10 percent of the total sales of automobiles would have to be nonpolluting, which meant that they would have to be electric vehicles or some combination of electric/gasoline vehicles.  The purpose was to determine smog levels in cities such as Los Angeles and Phoenix.
c) In the early 1990s, the California and Arizona state governments mandated that at least 10 percent of the total sales of automobiles would have to be nonpolluting, which meant that they would have to be electric vehicles or some combination of electric/gasoline vehicles, the purpose was to determine smog levels in cities such as Los Angeles and Phoenix.

 

 

d) In the early 1990s.  The California and Arizona state governments mandated that at least 10 percent of the total sales of automobiles would have to be nonpolluting, which meant that they would have to be electric vehicles or some combination of electric/gasoline vehicles.  The purpose was to determine smog levels in cities such as Los Angeles and Phoenix.

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Question 7 (1 point)

Please select the item that does not have any run-on sentences or sentence fragments.

Question 7 options:

a) Auto engineers in General Motors’ research and development unit in Detroit created a sleek, powerful auto that operated entirely on battery power.  It was called the IMPACT.  Due to the limited battery technology at the time, the IMPACT was limited to a range of 100 miles.  Then the vehicle had to be plugged into a 220-volt electrical outlet for three or four hours to recharge the batteries.
b) Auto engineers in General Motors’ research and development unit in Detroit created a sleek, powerful auto that operated entirely on battery power.  It was called the IMPACT.  Due to the limited battery technology at the time, the IMPACT was limited to a range of 100 miles, then the vehicle had to be plugged into a 220-volt electrical outlet for three or four hours to recharge the batteries.
c) Auto engineers in General Motors’ research and development unit in Detroit created a sleek, powerful auto that operated entirely on battery power, it was called the IMPACT.  Due to the limited battery technology at the time, the IMPACT was limited to a range of 100 miles.  Then the vehicle had to be plugged into a 220-volt electrical outlet for three or four hours to recharge the batteries.
d) Auto engineers in General Motors’ research and development unit in Detroit created a sleek, powerful auto that operated entirely on battery power.  It was called the IMPACT.  Due to the limited battery technology at the time, the IMPACT was limited to a range of 100 miles.  Then the vehicle had to be plugged into a 220-volt electrical outlet for three or four hours.  To recharge the batteries.

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Question 8 (1 point)

Please select the item that does not have any run-on sentences or sentence fragments.

Question 8 options:

a) One of the first lessons learned from the test marketing campaign was that “IMPACT” was a terrible name for the new car.  The mavens, who were the car enthusiasts sought as opinion leaders on the new car, worried about the light weight of the vehicle and the consequences of a crash with a heavier vehicle, therefore, the GM car was renamed the “EV-1,” for the corporation’s first electric vehicle.
b) One of the first lessons learned from the test marketing campaign was that “IMPACT” was a terrible name for the new car.  The mavens, who were the car enthusiasts sought as opinion leaders on the new car, worried about the light weight of the vehicle and the consequences of a crash with a heavier vehicle, therefore the GM car was renamed the “EV-1,” for the corporation’s first electric vehicle.
c) One of the first lessons learned from the test marketing campaign was that “IMPACT” was a terrible name for the new car.  The mavens, who were the car enthusiasts sought as opinion leaders on the new car. Worried about the light weight of the vehicle and the consequences of a crash with a heavier vehicle.  Therefore,  the GM car was renamed the “EV-1,” for the corporation’s first electric vehicle.
d) One of the first lessons learned from the test marketing campaign was that “IMPACT” was a terrible name for the new car.  The mavens, who were the car enthusiasts sought as opinion leaders on the new car, worried about the light weight of the vehicle and the consequences of a crash with a heavier vehicle.  Therefore, the GM car was renamed the “EV-1,” for the corporation’s first electric vehicle.

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Question 9 (1 point)

Please select the item that does not have any run-on sentences or sentence fragments.

Question 9 options:

a) At a rather high cost, General Motors gained important lessons about how diffusion scholars would stimulate interpersonal communication about a new vehicle, some of these lessons were immediately put to work in marketing another GM innovation, on-board global positions systems (GPS) that allowed an automobile driver to always know his/her exact location.
b) At a rather high cost, General Motors gained important lessons about how diffusion scholars would stimulate interpersonal communication about a new vehicle.  Some of these lessons were immediately put to work in marketing another GM innovation.  On-board global positions systems (GPS) that allowed an automobile driver to always know his/her exact location.
c) At a rather high cost, General Motors gained important lessons about how diffusion scholars would stimulate interpersonal communication about a new vehicle.  Some of these lessons were immediately put to work in marketing another GM innovation, on-board global positions systems (GPS) that allowed an automobile driver to always know his/her exact location.
d) At a rather high cost, General Motors gained important lessons.  About how diffusion scholars would stimulate interpersonal communication about a new vehicle.  Some of these lessons were immediately put to work in marketing another GM innovation, on-board global positions systems (GPS) that allowed an automobile driver to always know his/her exact location.

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Question 10 (1 point)

Please select the item that does not have any run-on sentences or sentence fragments.

Question 10 options:

a) The needs of marketers are usually given priority over those of consumers.  Sources often wish to know how they can influence consumers’ adoption behavior.  In contrast, consumers may wish to know how to insulate themselves from such influence attempts or, more generally, how they can evaluate new products.  The source bias in marketing diffusion studies may lead to highly applied research that, although methodologically sophisticated, deals with trivial diffusion problems in a theoretical sense, as a result, we may know more about consumer preferences for deodorant scents and the taste of beer than about how to best advance the theory of diffusion.
b) The needs of marketers are usually given priority over those of consumers.  Sources often wish to know how they can influence consumers’ adoption behavior.  In contrast, consumers may wish to know how to insulate themselves from such influence attempts or, more generally, how they can evaluate new products.  The source bias in marketing diffusion studies may lead to highly applied research that, although methodologically sophisticated, deals with trivial diffusion problems in a theoretical sense.  As a result, we may know more about consumer preferences for deodorant scents and the taste of beer than about how to best advance the theory of diffusion.
c) The needs of marketers are usually given priority over those of consumers.  Sources often wish to know how they can influence consumers’ adoption behavior.  In contrast, consumers may wish to know how to insulate themselves from such influence attempts.  Or, more generally, how they can evaluate new products.  The source bias in marketing diffusion studies may lead to highly applied research that, although methodologically sophisticated, deals with trivial diffusion problems in a theoretical sense.  As a result, we may know more about consumer preferences for deodorant scents and the taste of beer than about how to best advance the theory of diffusion.
 
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Posted by on June 17, 2017 in Academic Writing

 

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